24-hour, 200-student collegiate hackathon in San Luis Obispo

SLO Hacks is a 200-student, 24-hour hackathon hosted at Cal Poly SLO on February 3-4. Get ready for the largest hackathon in central California and a weekend full of building and learning! 

View full rules

Prizes

$6,238 in prizes

First Place

Nintendo Switches, Fire TV sticks, and iFixit kits for each member of the winning team

Second Place

Anker speakers, Tile Mates, and iFixit kits for each member of the winning team

Third Place

Google Home Minis for each member of the winning team

Best Google Cloud Platform Hack

Google Home Mini and a Chromecast for each member of the winning team, sponsored by Google Cloud Platform

Most Socially Responsible Hack

$100 Amazon gift card for each member of the team, sponsored by GoDaddy

Amazon Web Services - Best Use of AWS

$250 AWS credit

Best domain name from Domain.com

Raspberry Pi Kit for each member of the winning team

Best use of .tech

$250 Amazon gift card for each member of the winning team

TheHackHive.com Highest Voted Project

$40 Amazon gift card for each member of the winning team, sponsored by HackHive

Best use of Twilio API

Destek VR Headset for each member of the winning team, sponsored by Twilio

Best Hack from Intuit Challenge

Prompt: Solve a problem for a college student to help become more financially prosperous.

1st – Amazon Echo Dot & guaranteed interview
2nd – guaranteed interview

Best Game

Unity Pro License for each member of the winning team

Devpost Achievements

Submitting to this hackathon could earn you:

Eligibility

College students, or high schoolers over the age of 18. 

How to enter

If you have been accepted to the hackathon, you have been sent an Eventbrite invite, with a follow up logistical email. 

Judges

Jay Freeman

Jay Freeman
Founder of Cydia

Kyle Wiens

Kyle Wiens
CEO of iFixit

Jon York

Jon York
Director of Cal Poly Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Dan Weeks

Dan Weeks
Chairman of the Cal Poly CSSE Industrial Advisory Board

Judging Criteria

  • Originality
    Is the hack more than just another generic social/mobile/local app? Does it do something entirely novel, or at least take a fresh approach to an old problem?
  • Technical Difficulty
    Is the hack technically interesting or difficult? Is it just some lipstick on an API, or were there real technical challenges to surmount?
  • Polish
    Is the hack usable in its current state? Is the user experience smooth? Does everything appear to work? Is it well designed?
  • Usefulness
    Is the hack practical? Is it something people would actually use? Does it fulfill a real need people have?